Telent gets green light for signals contract extension

Transport for London has given Telent a one-year extension on its Traffic Control Maintenance contract.

Transport for London (TfL) has given Telent a one-year extension on its Traffic Control Maintenance contract.

Under the agreement, which Telent has held since 2014, the UK technology and network services firm will continue to supply, install and maintain more than 3,000 traffic control assets for TfL, including traffic signals, Variable Message Signs and Over-height Vehicle Detection systems.

Telent said it will continue to work with TfL to develop the asset investment programme and identify ways to work collaboratively.

The renewed contract began in July 2020 and will run until 2021 initially, with the option for a further year’s extension.

Telent declined to state the value of the contract extension. However, the Traffic Control Equipment Maintenance, Capital Works and Related Services (TCMS2) contracts were first awarded in 2014, at a total estimated cost of £317m, with Telent awarded two of five geographic lots.

This suggests that each lot was worth approximately £63m over eight years or £8m per year.

Adam Scriven, Telent’s account director, London Surface Communications, said: ‘This contract extension enables us to build on the excellent results achieved with TfL during the initial term of the contract and we are proud to continue to support London with our committed and expert team.

‘We are looking forward to continuing to work closely with TfL, building on our already excellent relationship and supporting the changes in programme to accommodate social distancing following the Coronavirus pandemic.’

Telent said that over the length of the contract, one of the solutions it has deployed for TfL is its innovative Plug and Play traffic signal system, which reduces time spent on essential traffic signal installation works.

TfL is responsible for managing traffic control infrastructure in Greater London on behalf of all 32 London boroughs and for the City of London Corporation, Highways England and the Royal Parks.

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